Suicide and homicide are the second and third leading causes of death...

Suicide and homicide are the second and third leading causes of death, respectively, among teens ages 15 to 19, after unintentional injury. In 2013, firearms were the instrument of death in 87 percent of teen homicides

...Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

10 - 13 year old males witnessing violence

More serious types of victimization, including assault with a weapon, sexual harassment, and kidnapping, were more common among 10- to 13-year-olds. This group was also the most likely to witness violence in the home, including domestic violence involving their parents, and assaults by other family members

Child Trends

14 - 17 year old males....more violent?

Fourteen- to 17-year-olds were most likely to experience the most serious forms of violence. Among these youth the most common types of exposure were assaults with injury, gang violence, sexual assaults, physical and emotional abuse, and witnessing violence in the community

Child Trends

Homicide is the leading cause of death...

Among 10 to 24 year-olds, homicide is the leading cause of death for African Americans; the second leading cause of death for Hispanics; and the third leading cause of death American Indians and Alaska Natives

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

DISPEL THE MYTH IN THE MINDS OF YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS THAT …

“VIOLENT DEATH IS HONORABLE AND

A WAY OF LIFE IN URBAN SOCIETY”

… AND NOT LOOK CASUALLY TO GUN VIOLENCE AS AN ACCEPTABLE MEANS OF RESOLVING CONFLICTS.

Watch the Video

Gun Violence in Teens

- Did you know?

Time to Stop Youth Violence is NOW

Teen homicide is the leading cause of death among African-American teens, and far more victims are male than female, but all teens can be at risk. Some factors that increase the chances than a teen will be a victim of violence or homicide are:

  • Involvement in gangs or fighting
  • Low parental involvement
  • Discipline that is inconsistent, lax, or too harsh
  • Use of drugs or alcohol by teen or parents
  • A history of violence in the home
  • Emotional problems/lack of self-control
  • Injuring animals or people
  • Lack of involvement in positive extracurricular activities
  • Exposure to media violence
  • Lack of economic opportunities in community/low income
  • Poor performance in school, especially due to learning disorders

Troubled Teen 101

Helping Youth Over Come Adversity – Prevention in crime and gun violence in teens

Scared Stiff Poem

Holding the community hostage
And putting them through it
Who killed my homie?
Tell me why they’d do it

Said it wasn’t his turf
He didn’t belong
Shot him down in the street
Now you know that was wrong…

Why did this have to happen? Why are children killing children?

Trap Kitchen LA: Former rival gang members form successful restaurant

Switch Lanez

Rappin 4Tay

Powerful message from Anthony Forte

Anthony Forte was one of the first coaches for the Midnight Basketball League Program for youth.

Image from Rappin4tay.wordpress.com

What is the Scared Stiff Program About?

Image by © Nancy HoneyTo provide alternatives for ‘at risk’ teens and young adults to the pervasive violence that has engulfed the inner city community.

To form a collaborative comprised of the religious community, business community, governmental agencies, education community, citizens and parents to support and guide teens and young adults to discover viable solutions that will reverse the escalation of violence.

  • Investigate causes for the proliferation of violence and find solutions to curtail gun violence
  • Provide opportunities to realize how gun violence impacts the entire community
  • Formulate a team of professionals and community members to interface with teens and young adults to implement change
  • Create avenues that promote positive social goals, self-esteem and life skills
  • Dispel myths and misinformation regarding the glamorization of violence
  • Exposure to diverse cultural, social and industry activities

Increase program participant’s knowledge, appreciation and understanding of their rich history, culture and heritage.

Educational Opportunities

Counseling

Mentoring

Workshops – focusing on life skills, health education, mental health concerns, employment and social services.

Panel discussions, presentations and videos addressing the negative effects of violence and available alternatives.

Relationships with schools, community centers, Juvenile Detention Centers, Recreation Centers and other Social Service Agencies.

The ‘Scared Stiff’ Program is an outreach of The Association of Midnight Basketball League Programs.

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“It’s Time”

Important message by The Winans

Antoine Hoskins-McQueen

“My Daughter”

This young is one of our great past participant in our Scared Stiff Program and coaches in our Jr. Midnight Basketball League. One of the great testimonies on how the programs work.

“Pray”, by Tom Chappell

“Pray” is the new official video from Tom Chappell (akaTN’T) directed by Joseph H. James Jr. “Pray” is taken from the album Don’t Let Go TN’T Trish N’ Tom. “Pray” is the first single released by tritom music since the passing of Trish who was one half of the dynamic duo Trish N’ Tom. 

See more about the Scared Stiff Program and partnerships of community action.

See more videos about the Scared Stiff Program

SCARED STIFF HAS PUT TOGETHER A TEAM OF PROFESSIONALS AND COMMUNITY PEOPLE TO LET IT BE KNOWN THAT

“THEY ARE TIRED OF GUN VIOLENCE IN OUR CITIES and COMMUNITIES.”

THIS PUBLIC FORUM IS DESIGNED TO SHOW THE DEVASTATION THAT HAPPENS WHEN SOMEONE IN THE COMMUNITY DIES FROM GUN SHOT WOUNDS.

In The News

See the headlines in what is going on the communities, families and teens the a program like Scared Stiff matters.

Survivors Speak 2016 Conference

This conference was about Remembering Victims of Violence. Being a victim or survivor of crime can cause psychological pain or trauma. Sharing our stories is a vital part of healing and community, but it is important to notice how these powerful stories affect us. The...

Resources for Victims of Crime

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L to R – Kim Mitchell -T.U.R. F., SFPD Chief – Tony Chaplin, Lawrence C. Gray, Jr. – AMBLP/SFMBLP, and Rev. Erris Edgerly – Brothers For Change, Inc. Meeting with the new Chief to introduce ourselves and our programs!

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